That awkward Bug girl

Hey, I'm Anna! I'm just your average art major/ bug dork.
Feel free to send me any questions, or submit your own photographs!
Reblogged from adambatchelor  2,524 notes

adambatchelor:

New Entomology series now online.

"Created as a spin on entomology collections, insects pinned down into a black box frame for a lifetime of observation and appreciation. Drawn solely with coloured pencils these new drawings give a rare glimpse into the mating habits of these beautiful creatures."

You can buys prints from this series from Art Wednesday.

These are fantastic!

ATTENTION SATURNIID REARERS!!!

My friend greek-amara and I are doing a moth trade.

I have lots of Cecropia babies, and she has some too (as well as one male Polyphemus)

We are looking to trade some of our moths so we can create more diversity and mate their offspring. Please contact one of us if you are interested in trading one or more of your Cecropia’s, or have a female Polyphemus to mate. 

Reblogged from doctorbuggs  16 notes
Hey, fellow insect lover! I've seen quite a few of your posts recently. I raise Cecropia moths in upstate New York. Just wanted to say that I look forward to seeing your posts! :3 -Bug

doctorbuggs:

Whoa! Another fellow moth raiser! We should trade stories and advice and stuff. It’s tough bein a single parent with so many caterpillar mouths to feed! We’ve got to stick together! 

Definitely! Although, you’ve probably got a lot more advice to give than I do! 

have you ever taken a cocoon from a tree? if i did this would it be mean? i really want to know what cool moth will emerge. thank you.
Anonymous

I have done that, actually! Mine turned out to be a beautiful female Polyphemus.

I’ve actually gone out hunting for them this way. it’s much easier to find moths while they’re pupating, or as caterpillars rather than as full grown adult moths.

It kind of depends on where you’re located I guess.  If you were to remove the cocoon from the tree I would definitely cut part of the branch with it, so you’re less likely to hurt the moth baby on the inside.

Another thing to keep in mind is the climate of where you’re going to be keeping your moth when you take it from the tree.  If it’s cold where you’re at, you’re going to need to keep it outside (or cold enough to mimic outside temperatures.) I’ve heard of people keeping their cocoons in the crisper of their refrigerator, but I’d imagine you probably shouldn’t put them in the freezer.

Considering you did find a cocoon in a tree, it’s probably a saturniid (silk moth), so it won’t need to eat.. but do your research on the moths in your area.  If you’re in America, one of the best sites I’ve found for this is BAMONA   Here you can do a search of all the moths who have been verified in your area specifically.


Lastly, good luck to you and your new buggy!  Keep me posted, too! I love seeing what other people have found :)

-Bug

Reblogged from sadcartoon  32,909 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Nembrotha cristata

like most nudibranchs this species has no official common name. they can be found in tropical Indo-Western Pacific oceans. they grow up to 50mm in length and their body is black but their external organs are edged in a almost neon green like color. they are poisonous and get their poison from the stinging cells of fallen Cnidarians.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-*-Polyceroidea-Polyceridae-Nembrothinae-Nembrotha

*Clades: Heterobranchia,Euthynerua,Nudipleura,Nudibranchia,Euctenidacea,Doridacea

Reblogged from khrysdiebee  184 notes
rhamphotheca:

Beach Tourists Who Collect Shells May Be Harming the Environment
At one beach in Spain, increasing numbers of tourists have caused a 60 percent decline in shell abundance, potentially disrupting the aquatic ecosystem
by Rachel Nuwer
Walking along the seashore in search of shells and other curios is a favorite pastime for beachgoers of all ages. When those whimsical walkers pocket the nautical treasures they find on the beach, however, there can be unintended environmental repercussions.
Shells provide a diverse swath of environmental functions: they help to stabilize beaches and anchor seagrass; they provide homes for creatures such as hermit crabs and hiding places for small fish; they are used by shorebirds to build nests; and when they break down, they provide nutrients for the organisms living in the sand or for thsoe that build their own shells. 
According to new research published in PLoS One, seemingly innocent shell collecting may be having an impact on these environmental functions. As tourism increases at a beach, researchers found, the number of shells found there, in turn, decreases. This might lead to a decline in beach health. 
This study did not explore those potential detrimental environmental impacts caused by missing shells, but the authors think the habitat changes might be “multiple,” including increased beach erosion, a decline in calcium carbonate from recycled shells and a drop in diversity and abundance of animals and plants that depend on shells, such as crabs, small fishes, algae and seagrass…
(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photo of whelk by irraa

rhamphotheca:

Beach Tourists Who Collect Shells May Be Harming the Environment

At one beach in Spain, increasing numbers of tourists have caused a 60 percent decline in shell abundance, potentially disrupting the aquatic ecosystem

by Rachel Nuwer

Walking along the seashore in search of shells and other curios is a favorite pastime for beachgoers of all ages. When those whimsical walkers pocket the nautical treasures they find on the beach, however, there can be unintended environmental repercussions.

Shells provide a diverse swath of environmental functions: they help to stabilize beaches and anchor seagrass; they provide homes for creatures such as hermit crabs and hiding places for small fish; they are used by shorebirds to build nests; and when they break down, they provide nutrients for the organisms living in the sand or for thsoe that build their own shells. 

According to new research published in PLoS One, seemingly innocent shell collecting may be having an impact on these environmental functions. As tourism increases at a beach, researchers found, the number of shells found there, in turn, decreases. This might lead to a decline in beach health. 

This study did not explore those potential detrimental environmental impacts caused by missing shells, but the authors think the habitat changes might be “multiple,” including increased beach erosion, a decline in calcium carbonate from recycled shells and a drop in diversity and abundance of animals and plants that depend on shells, such as crabs, small fishes, algae and seagrass…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photo of whelk by irraa