That awkward Bug girl

Hey, I'm Bug! I'm just your average art major/ bug dork.
Feel free to send me any questions, or submit your own photographs!
Reblogged from delanik  5 notes
Does it work for any kind of bug? Like, moths, beetles, even caterpillars?
Anonymous

delanik:

awkwardbuggirl:

Well, it definitely works for moths and butterflies. 
I’ve never had much luck pinning beetles, but It could potentially work for them.  And I’ve never heard of pinning caterpillars, so I’m not sure what you could do for them. 

There’s a way to sort-of pin caterpillars.  Basically, you have to gut them, inflate them, and bake them for a little bit.  I’ve never done it myself—but I’ve seen specimens that have undergone the process in a museum.  It’s weird and I imagine difficult to do.

Otherwise, you preserve them in alcohol.  If you boil them quickly beforehand I hear they keep their colors better for future identification and stuff.  

Thanks for clearing that up! I’d feel too guilty preserving caterpillars, I think. I’d rather see them as adults first!

Reblogged from thelepidopteragirl  400 notes

mucholderthen:

HEY MAN, WHAT HAPPENED?  YOU LOOK LIKE S#%@.
OR This Moth Looks Like Bird Poop

Mother Nature is pretty awesome, especially when she has the sense of humor of a ten year old boy. You might be aware that the caterpillars of the giant swallowtail butterfly have evolved to look like bird droppings as way to avoid being eaten by predators. Most predators don’t enjoy eating bird poop, so this strategy ensures that many caterpillars will survive long enough to pupate and emerge as winged adults, which will in turn mate and lay eggs and keep the species going.

Well, giant swallowtails aren’t alone in using this strategy

Meet the pearly wood nymph (Eudryas unio).  Doesn’t look very appetizing, does it?

Pearly wood nymphs are found across eastern North America and lay their eggs on wild grapes, hibiscus, and evening primrose.

Photos by Dani Tinker.
SOURCE: Animal Planet: Animal Oddities07/07/2014

Hat tip to Why Evolution Is True, who also refers us to Bug Guide for more pix of Eudryas unio. 

My mom found one of these guys the other day, and gave it to me. I was worried that it was coated in fungus or something, but nope! They just look disgusting naturally!

Does it work for any kind of bug? Like, moths, beetles, even caterpillars?
Anonymous

Well, it definitely works for moths and butterflies. 
I’ve never had much luck pinning beetles, but It could potentially work for them.  And I’ve never heard of pinning caterpillars, so I’m not sure what you could do for them. 

How do you preserve bugs and pin them?
Anonymous

Well, when I’m raising them, I typically take the first female and first male to come out and stick them in the freezer right away (after their wings dry)  so I know their wings will be in good shape, and I’ll have at least those to look forward to preserving.

When they’re frozen, they stay nice and fresh for a really long time, so you don’t have to worry about them drying out and becoming too brittle to move.

I use scraps of balsa wood, regular sewing pins and white paper cut into half inch thick strips to pin them after I thaw them.  Potentially you could do it the same day, but I’m always afraid they’ll come back to life. Haha.